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Thread: People's Spelling and Punctuation.

  1. #21
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    ..and don't forget the spoken word with such things as:

    Houwer for hour
    Atool for at all - which is two words starting with a vowel
    Yesterday BBC had sellable instead of saleable
    Souwer instead of sour
    Brexit has become Bregzit

    Just a few of many. Modern journalism standards suck Would you believe the BBC do actually have a pronunciation dept?

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  3. #22
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    Don't forget that most media companies use computers to check text and subtitles, the mistakes come so thick and fast and its most entertaining.

    The presenters on programmes that all use autocue produce the most amusing results, they use phrase book style pronunciation, ie, Monopoly = Mo-no-poly, and that's how they say it on air. he he.

  4. #23
    Senior Member bamber's Avatar
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    Another irritating mispronunciation is when people add an extra syllable to mischievous and say mis-CHEE-vee-us instead of MIS-chiv-us.

  5. #24
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    this thread started something yesterday in our house,my niece was visiting
    she got her results a few weeks ago...and i have to say proud of her
    she is just 16..took exams a year early..9 subjects 1= A* 7= A+ 1= B+
    based on those she has been accepted to king edwards collage
    so i said to her...i went university..she laughed
    i said its true...and i still attend..its called the university of life...and no one has ever graduated...you always die before you can graduate
    because in life you are learning all the time
    it shut her up...lol

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by EXTRAFACTO View Post
    this thread started something yesterday in our house,my niece was visiting
    she got her results a few weeks ago...and i have to say proud of her
    she is just 16..took exams a year early..9 subjects 1= A* 7= A+ 1= B+
    based on those she has been accepted to king edwards collage
    so i said to her...i went university..she laughed
    i said its true...and i still attend..its called the university of life...and no one has ever graduated...you always die before you can graduate
    because in life you are learning all the time
    it shut her up...lol
    Not one sentence you wrote has started or ended with a capital letter or full stop, name such as "king edwards collage" should be "King Edwards College". Now don't take this the wrong way as I am not having a go at you in particular, however your post is the kind of spelling and punctuation I am talking about. It's OK for some people to make mistakes, but not for the BBC or national newspapers - especially on live TV. Those people are paid extremely well, so I expect a certain level of education from them, especially when you have people from around the world looking at those programs and thinking "That's the British for you - illiterate".

  8. #26
    V.I.P traveller's Avatar
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    Languages always evolve as it's our free use of it, still they have to have some structure and rules. English must baffle some and not just non English speakers.

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  10. #27
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    Mrdude, I agree entirely with you. I hate seeing bad English and grammar. However, just to be extra pernickety "King Edwards College" should be "King Edward's College".
    Sorry!
    Let us add missing or wrong apostrophes to the agenda! That's a new can of worms

  11. #28
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    @007.4, Yes you're quite right, that'll teach me for using 'copy and paste'. The main point is though, How can we expect the general public to be able to spell properly, when the TV/BBC/Newspapers are getting it wrong so often?

  12. #29
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    ok thats me with the dunces cap on
    its called forum chat
    if i was actually writing a letter of importance
    i would make sure,that i crossed all my t and dotted my i
    and not forum typo or typed
    i have big c--k and plenty of money...so i guess 2 out of 3 is not 2 bad...lol

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  14. #30
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    Well I had a right owd chuckle over this one!! The original post seems to be talking in generic terms when posting a picture of a bizarre BBC spelling error! The title includes the word people's. Surely it should be peoples'? Apologies if I am wrong but my excuse will be that here at Glassback Manor we still predominantly converse in latin.

  15. #31
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    Paenitet.
    You're wrong. "People's" is correct. That is, it is the spelling of the "people" (plural).

  16. #32
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    this english lesson is way over my head
    but not dun bad in life ,even if i say so myself
    so A E I O U....How now brown cow..the i before the e..except after c
    cos kick a bow agan a wow and head it till yer bost it
    now back to my bacon cheese tomatos and Oatcakes

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  18. #33
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    I'll throw another one at you: should it be " a hospital " or " an hospital "? I was taught that the letter "h" is an aspirant and as such should be ignored. Personally I always use "an" in front of words beginning with aitch. Please feel free to sh**t me down in flames if I'm wrong. :-)

  19. #34
    Cool Dude Barney's Avatar
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    Depends on what sentence it is being used in , For example I feel sick later today i may visit the hospital .
    No need for "an",or "a" like in that example .
    But "a hospital" would be correct in this example "There was a fire last night in a hospital somewhere in the city of Manchester ".

    There is no such thing is "an" hospital unless of course your trying to learn Irish language ? .
    slainte @ TheBadger . : ))

  20. #35
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    Going back to the opening post, it just looks like a typing error, I and o keys at the same time.
    Obviously someone should have noticed it before airing.

  21. #36
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    What REALLY "GETS" me is hearing someone (MANY in fact") on TV saying "..young age..." when the "should" be saying "..early age..", or ".. fast speed.. " instead of "..high speed.." (etc., etc., etc.!)

    Maybe I'll be called "old fashioned" buts that's what I was taught at school, but, to me, all the above "really grate" when I hear them!

  22. #37
    V.I.P Detlef's Avatar
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    The English language is totally indefensible as there are more exceptions than rules.

    Various elite monarchs have added bits from their country of origin plus allowing all sorts of alien words to infiltrate.

    Due to its size and influence, the USA has become the custodian of (world) English and we can blame them as well for computer speak (but not mobile text as they prefer oral communication).

    Many of the typos on the various forums (and especially FB and Twitter) are due to fat fingers and small smartphone keyboards.

    Last rants:
    A pet hate of mine is superfluous adjectives, for example "anytime soon" - what information does the anytime add.
    Another is phrases where one word would suffice , for example "at this moment in time" = now.

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  24. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Detlef View Post
    The English language is totally indefensible as there are more exceptions than rules.

    Various elite monarchs have added bits from their country of origin plus allowing all sorts of alien words to infiltrate.

    Due to its size and influence, the USA has become the custodian of (world) English and we can blame them as well for computer speak (but not mobile text as they prefer oral communication).

    Many of the typos on the various forums (and especially FB and Twitter) are due to fat fingers and small smartphone keyboards.

    Last rants:
    A pet hate of mine is superfluous adjectives, for example "anytime soon" - what information does the anytime add.
    Another is phrases where one word would suffice , for example "at this moment in time" = now.
    One of my pet hates is the way that some black people speak in London. People that were born in the UK and have gone to English schools, and yet they speak like they come from east L.A or Jamaica or something like that. Instead of using words such a 'Them or That', they use 'Dem or Dat' or something equally non-English.

    The weird thing is though, you can have 2 people that were born in the UK and have lived in the exact same street, have gone to the same schools and speak totally different - go figure that out?

    Having gone to school in both Scotland and North West London, I can tell you this for a fact, Scottish children are far smarter than those I encountered in London. Also Asians (Indians and Chinese) seem to be very smart and smarter than white people, and the black people were the dumbest (This is not meant to be racist, just an observation and my personal opinion). It was most likely down to the teaching standards and the fact the the teachers were only able to teach at a pace that all the children could cope with, now when you had people in your class that could barely speak English, you can see how brighter children suffered as they were slowed down in their learning while waiting for others to catch up.
    Last edited by mrdude; 17-10-2017 at 12:56 PM.

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  26. #39
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    Detlef

    When at school (!) in the "English language" classes - and in the GCE (not GCSE!) English Language exam - we had to do a lot of "précising", i.e. reducing a fairly long piece of text to a defined much shorter one (typically a few hundred words) without losing the sense of the original - that taught me a lot about doing exactly what you said in your last para. Became very useful in later life when trying to reduce wordy & confusing written texts (both from others and from me) to something far more intelligible.

    All we seem to get from many people nowadays is either "mobile text shorthand" OR long, meandering prose that is pretty unintelligible - thinking that more people should be taught some of the "old stuff" like précising and then they might all be able to communicate more effectively!

  27. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrdude View Post
    they speak like they come from east L.A or Jamaica or something like that. Instead of using words such a 'Them or That', they use 'Dem or Dat' or something equally non-English.
    Sounds a bit like the old north Sheffield accent, colloquially know to other locals as "dee-dars". I think they pre-dated the Jamaicans!
    Last edited by sparky_dog; 16-10-2017 at 11:11 PM.

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